WRENS

Pacific Wren 

SCIENTIFIC NAME: Troglodytes pacificus

Pacific Wren

The Pacific Wren is one of the smallest wrens in the United States, it has a short, stubby tail which it usually holds upright. It is the western counterpart of Winter Wren (formerly considered one species).

Adults are rufous-brown above, richly colored below, barred with darker brown and dusky, even on wings and tail. The bill is dark brown, the legs pale brown.

Young birds are less distinctly barred.

Both adults measures 3.1 - 4.7 inches in length, with a wingspan of 4.7 - 6.3 inches and weighs about 8 - 12 grams.

CALL: Male and female give one sharp "check" call similar to the call of a Wilson’s Warbler.

SONG: A sweet series of tumbling, trilling notes with a staccato quality. They have a large catalog of complex songs. Males sing for 5 - 10 seconds, stringing together as many as 50 different phrases.
They sing regularly during the breeding season from mid-April to August but irregularly during the nonbreeding season.

Primarily feeds on insects and spiders, as well as snails, millipedes, tiny fish, and berries.

SUMMER BREEDING SEASON: Moist conifer forests with a dense understory, often near water.

WINTER: Similar forest habitats with dense understories, although they will use deciduous and mixed forests as well as conifer forests.

BREEDS: Along the Pacific coast from Alaska to California and inland as far as Wyoming and the Black Hills of South Dakota.

WINTERS: Across the western half of the United States and Canada.

The male builds a nest out of moss, bark, twigs, rootlets, grass, and other plant material they find close to the nest site to help with camouflage. Both sexes line the nest with feathers and animal hair. The nest size varies depending on the size of the cavity and placement of the nest. At times, nests can be the size of a football.

The female lays 1 - 9 white eggs with small pale to reddish-brown spots concentrated on the larger end of the egg. Incubation lasts for 14 - 17 days. Nestling period about 15 - 17 days.

 

SOURCES:
https://en.wikipedia.org
https://www.allaboutbirds.org
https://www.sdakotabirds.com

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